Articles | Volume 21, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5427–5442, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5427-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5427–5442, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5427-2017

Research article 06 Nov 2017

Research article | 06 Nov 2017

Forest impacts on snow accumulation and ablation across an elevation gradient in a temperate montane environment

Travis R. Roth and Anne W. Nolin

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (14 Feb 2017) by Jan Seibert
AR by Travis R. Roth on behalf of the Authors (29 Mar 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 Apr 2017) by Jan Seibert
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (26 Jun 2017)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (12 Jul 2017) by Jan Seibert
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (29 Aug 2017)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by Editor) (03 Sep 2017) by Jan Seibert
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (08 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (09 Sep 2017) by Jan Seibert
Download
Short summary
Maritime snowpacks are temperature sensitive and experience disproportionate effects of climate warming and changing forest cover. We studied the combined effects of forest cover, climate variability, and elevation on snow in a maritime montane environment. The dense, relatively warm forests at Low and Mid sites impede snow accumulation through increased canopy snow interception and increased energy inputs to the snowpack. These results are needed for improved forest cover model representation.