Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-545
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-545

  10 Nov 2021

10 Nov 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal HESS.

A review of the applicability of the Motivations and Abilities (MOTA) framework for assessing the implementation success of water resources management plans and policies

John Conallin1, Nathan Ning1, Jennifer Bond1, Nicholas Pawsey1, Lee Baumgartner1, Dwi Atminarso1,2,3, Hannah McPherson4, Wayne Robinson1, and Garry Thorncraft1,5 John Conallin et al.
  • 1Institute of Land, Water and Society, Charles Sturt University, PO Box 789, Albury, NSW, 2640, Australia
  • 2Research Institute for Inland Fisheries and Fisheries Extensions, Agency for Marine and Fisheries Research, Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries, Jalan H.A. Bastari 08, Jakabaring, Palembang City, South Sumatra 30267, Indonesia
  • 3Inland Fisheries Resources Development and Management Department, Southeast Asia Fisheries Development Center, Jalan H.A. Bastari 08, Jakabaring, Palembang City, South Sumatra 30267, Indonesia
  • 4Hendricks Consulting, Albury, NSW, 2640, Australia
  • 5National University of Laos, PO Box 7322, Vientiane, Lao PDR

Abstract. Implementation failure is widely acknowledged as a major impediment to the success of water resource plans and policies, yet there are very few proactive approaches available for analysing potential implementation issues during the planning stage. The Motivations and Abilities (MOTA) framework was established to address this planning stage gap, by offering a multi-stakeholder, multi-level approach to evaluate the implementation feasibility of plans and policies. MOTA is a stepwise process focusing on the relationship between trigger, motivation, and ability. Here we outline the base model of the MOTA framework and review existing MOTA applications in assorted water resource management contexts. From our review we identify the strengths and limitations of the MOTA framework in various institutional implementation and social adoptability contexts. Our findings indicate that the existing MOTA base model framework has been successful in identifying the motivations and abilities of the stakeholders involved in a range of bottom-up water resource planning contexts, and in subsequently providing insight into the types of capacity- or consent-building strategies needed for effective implementation. We propose several complementary add-in applications to complement the base model, which specific applications may benefit from. Specifically, the incorporation of formal context and stakeholder analyses during the problem definition stage (Step 1), could provide a more considered basis for designing the latter steps within the MOTA analyses. In addition, the resolution of the MOTA analyses could be enhanced by developing more nuanced scoring approaches, or by adopting empirically proven ones from well-established published models. Through setting the base model application, additional add-in applications can easily be added to enhance different aspects of the analysis while still maintaining comparability with other MOTA applications. With a robust base model and a suite of add-in applications, there is great potential for the MOTA framework to become a staple tool for optimising implementation success in any water planning and policy-making context.

John Conallin et al.

Status: open (until 05 Jan 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on hess-2021-545', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Nov 2021 reply

John Conallin et al.

John Conallin et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 220 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
191 27 2 220 19 1 0
  • HTML: 191
  • PDF: 27
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 220
  • Supplement: 19
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 10 Nov 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 10 Nov 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 208 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 208 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 01 Dec 2021
Download
Short summary
Implementation failure is well known to be a major barrier to the success of water resource plans and policies. The Motivations and Abilities (MOTA) approach attempts to address this barrier, by providing a multi-stakeholder, multi-level tool to assess triggers, motivations and abilities supporting the implementation feasibility of plans. We review existing MOTA applications in various water management contexts, and propose several complementary add-in applications to complement the approach.