Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-137
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-137

  24 Mar 2021

24 Mar 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal HESS and is expected to appear here in due course.

Global water resources knowledge gaps 

Shuanglei Wu1, Yongping Wei1, and Xuemei Wang2 Shuanglei Wu et al.
  • 1School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, the University of Queensland, Brisbane, 4072, Australia
  • 2University Library, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400715, China

Abstract. The stationarity of hydrological systems is dead. Has our hydrological/water resources knowledge well transformed to address this change? By using publications indexed in the Web of Science database since 1900, we aim to investigate the global development of water resources knowledge at river basin scale from a system science perspective. Water resources knowledge development in a river basin is defined as a complex system involving the co-evolutionary dynamics of scientific disciplines and management issues. It is found that: 1) centralised and legacy-inclined water resources knowledge structures dominated major river basins in the world; 2) links between water resources knowledge structure and the management issues it addressed are increasingly homogenised; and 3) cross-disciplinary collaborations have remained largely unchanged and collaborations with social sciences have been very limited. In conclusions, the stationarity of the water resources knowledge system persists. A shift of water resources knowledge development to cope with the rapidly changing hydrological systems and associated management issues is urgently needed.

Shuanglei Wu et al.

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of "Global water resources knowledge gaps" by Wu et al.', Hubert H.G. Savenije, 22 Apr 2021
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Shuanglei Wu, 01 May 2021
      • RC3: 'Reply on CC1', Hubert H.G. Savenije, 01 May 2021
        • AC2: 'Reply on RC3', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on hess-2021-137', Li Xu, 29 Apr 2021
    • CC2: 'Reply on RC2', Shuanglei Wu, 09 May 2021
      • RC4: 'Reply on CC2 by Wu et al.', Li Xu, 10 May 2021
        • AC4: 'Reply on RC4', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of "Global water resources knowledge gaps" by Wu et al.', Hubert H.G. Savenije, 22 Apr 2021
    • CC1: 'Reply on RC1', Shuanglei Wu, 01 May 2021
      • RC3: 'Reply on CC1', Hubert H.G. Savenije, 01 May 2021
        • AC2: 'Reply on RC3', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on hess-2021-137', Li Xu, 29 Apr 2021
    • CC2: 'Reply on RC2', Shuanglei Wu, 09 May 2021
      • RC4: 'Reply on CC2 by Wu et al.', Li Xu, 10 May 2021
        • AC4: 'Reply on RC4', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC2', Yongping Wei, 21 May 2021

Shuanglei Wu et al.

Shuanglei Wu et al.

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Short summary
Using publications indexed in the Web of Science, we investigated water resources knowledge development at river basin scale since 1900 and found centralised knowledge structures dominated several large river basins, increasingly homogenised links between knowledge structure and management issues, and largely static cross-disciplinary collaborations. There is urgent need to shift knowledge development to cope with the rapidly changing hydrological systems and management issues arising from it.