Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2020-80
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2020-80
20 Apr 2020
 | 20 Apr 2020
Status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Assessing ecosystem services under water stress in the largest inland river basin in China based on hydro-ecological modeling

Yang Yu, Markus Disse, Philipp Huttner, Xi Chen, Andreas Brieden, Marie Hinnenthal, Haiyan Zhang, Jiaqiang Lei, Fanjiang Zeng, Lingxiao Sun, Yuting Gao, and Ruide Yu

Abstract. Ecological changes in arid lands are often determined by the available water resources. For ecological protection, it is important to consider both hydrological and ecological processes. This paper presents a modeling approach to assess environmental changes and ecosystem services (ESS) in the largest inland river basin in China. Current water cycle and ecosystem protection measures were simulated, and future land use change scenarios were proposed accordingly. China is on the frontline of ecosystem protection and afforestation, but according to the simulation results, the available water resources cannot support more vegetation in its largest inland river basin. Without an additional water supply, 25.9 % of the existing area of natural vegetation will be degraded by 2050. A reduction in the area of cotton plantation did not substantially reduce farming incomes in the simulation. Drip irrigation and ecological flooding was effective for improving ESS, especially agricultural provisioning and riparian forest provisioning services, as well as regulating and supporting services. The assessment of ESS can achieve socio-economic and ecological benefits in a sustainable way, and also enable the impact of the complex environmental factors to be understood. The results can be used to evaluate current situations and develop creative solutions.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Yang Yu, Markus Disse, Philipp Huttner, Xi Chen, Andreas Brieden, Marie Hinnenthal, Haiyan Zhang, Jiaqiang Lei, Fanjiang Zeng, Lingxiao Sun, Yuting Gao, and Ruide Yu
 
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Yang Yu, Markus Disse, Philipp Huttner, Xi Chen, Andreas Brieden, Marie Hinnenthal, Haiyan Zhang, Jiaqiang Lei, Fanjiang Zeng, Lingxiao Sun, Yuting Gao, and Ruide Yu
Yang Yu, Markus Disse, Philipp Huttner, Xi Chen, Andreas Brieden, Marie Hinnenthal, Haiyan Zhang, Jiaqiang Lei, Fanjiang Zeng, Lingxiao Sun, Yuting Gao, and Ruide Yu

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Short summary
The afforestation actions in China have attracted widely attention in recent years. This paper presents a hydro-ecological modeling approach to assess environmental changes and ecosystem services in the largest inland river basin in China. Our result indicates China's tree-planting in the Tarim River Basin is strictly strained by water stress and 25.9 % of the existing area of natural vegetation will be degraded by 2050. It is a warning for decision-makers and stakeholders.