Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2018-449
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2018-449

  17 Sep 2018

17 Sep 2018

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal HESS but the revision was not accepted.

Catchment-scale groundwater recharge and vegetation water use efficiency

Peter A. Troch1, Ravindra Dwivedi1, Tao Liu1, Antonio Alves Meira Neto1, Tirthankar Roy1, Rodrigo Valdés-Pineda1, Matej Durcik1, Saúl Arciniega-Esparza2, and José Agustín Breña-Naranjo2 Peter A. Troch et al.
  • 1Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
  • 2Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico

Abstract. Precipitation undergoes a two-step partitioning when it falls on the land surface. At the land surface and in the shallow subsurface, rainfall or snowmelt can either runoff as infiltration/saturation excess or quick subsurface flow. The rest will be stored temporarily in the root zone. From the root zone, water can leave the catchment as evapotranspiration or percolate further and recharge deep storage. It was recently shown that an index of vegetation water use efficiency, the Horton index (HI), could predict deep storage dynamics. Here we test this finding using 247 MOPEX catchments across the conterminous US. Our results show that the observed HI is indeed a reliable predictor of deep storage dynamics. We also find that the HI can reliably predict the long-term average recharge rate. Our results compare favorably with estimates of average recharge rates from the US Geological Survey. Previous research has shown that HI can be estimated based on aridity index, mean slope and mean elevation of a catchment (Voepel et al., 2011). We recalibrated Voepel’s model and used it to predict the HI for our catchments. We then used these predicted values of the HI to estimate average recharge rates for our catchments, and compared them with those estimated from observed HI. We find that the accuracies of our predictions based on observed and predicted HI are similar. This provides a novel estimation method of catchment-scale long-term average recharge rates based on simple catchment characteristics, such as climate and topography, and free of discharge measurements.

Peter A. Troch et al.

 
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Status: closed
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Peter A. Troch et al.

Peter A. Troch et al.

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Latest update: 25 Jan 2022
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Short summary
Recharge to bedrock aquifers is an important source of water availability and sustains streamflow during long dry periods. It is therefore an important component in the catchment water balance that sustains aquatic ecosystems. Our study shows that it is possible to predict average recharge rates at the catchment scale using only climate and landscape properties. This is an important finding as it is notoriously difficult to measure and/or estimate recharge rates at large spatial scales.