Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2016-30
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2016-30
02 Mar 2016
 | 02 Mar 2016
Status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Hydrological model assessment for flood early warning in a tropical high mountain basin

María Carolina Rogelis, Micha Werner, Nelson Obregón, and Nigel Wright

Abstract. A distributed model (TETIS), a semi-distributed model (TOPMODEL) and a lumped model (HEC HMS soil moisture accounting) were used to simulate the discharge response of a tropical high mountain basin characterized by soils with high water storage capacity and high conductivity. The models were calibrated with the Shuffle Complex Evolution algorithm, using the Kling and Gupta efficiency as objective function. Performance analysis and diagnostics were carried out using the signatures of the flow duration curve and through analysis of the model fluxes in order to identify the most appropriate model for the study area for flood early warning. The impact of varying grid sizes was assessed in the TETIS model and the TOPMODEL in order to chose a model with balanced model performance and computational efficiency. The sensitivity of the models to variation in the precipitation input was analysed by forcing the models with a rainfall ensemble obtained from Gaussian simulation. The resulting discharge ensembles of each model were compared in order to identify differences among models structures. The results show that TOPMODEL is the most realistic model of the three tested, albeit showing the largest discharge ensemble spread. The main differences among models occur between HEC HMS soil moisture accounting and TETIS, and HEC HMS soil moisture accounting and TOPMODEL, with HEC HMS soil moisture accounting producing ensembles in a range lower than the other two models. The ensembles of TETIS and TOPMODEL are more similar.

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María Carolina Rogelis, Micha Werner, Nelson Obregón, and Nigel Wright
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
María Carolina Rogelis, Micha Werner, Nelson Obregón, and Nigel Wright
María Carolina Rogelis, Micha Werner, Nelson Obregón, and Nigel Wright

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Short summary
A distributed model (TETIS), a semi-distributed model (TOPMODEL) and a lumped model (HEC HMS soil moisture accounting) were used to simulate the discharge response of a tropical high mountain basin. Performance analysis and diagnostics were carried out in order to identify the most appropriate model for the study area for flood early warning. The results show that TOPMODEL is the most realistic model of the three tested.