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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hessd-10-10161-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/hessd-10-10161-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  08 Aug 2013

08 Aug 2013

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This preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Modelling and monitoring nutrient pollution at the large catchment scale: the implications of sampling regimes on model performance

R. Adams1, P. F. Quinn2, and M. J. Bowes3 R. Adams et al.
  • 1Visiting Scientist, School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK
  • 2School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK
  • 3Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, OX10 8BB, UK

Abstract. Daily and sub daily nutrient data are now becoming available to support nutrient research and which will help underpin policy making. It is vital that water quality models that utilize these high-frequency data sets are both appropriate and suitably accurate. Here we address the capability of process based models applied at larger catchment scales (size 100–500 km2) and show what phenomena can be simulated by exploiting high frequency data for larger catchments. Hence we can suggest the dominant processes that underpin the fluxes observed in larger catchment and thus what can be simulated, and to what accuracy. Thus the implications of new sampling frequency and model structure can be addressed and the implication to catchment management is discussed. Here we show a case study using the Frome catchment (414 km2), Dorset UK, which demonstrates:

1. The use of process based model of nutrient flow and nutrient flux (TOPCAT) for use in larger catchments.
2. Simulations of high frequency data at weekly and sub daily time steps, thus reflecting the simulations' strengths and weaknesses.
3. Cumulative distributions of observed and simulated fluxes – as an effective means of communicating the catchment dynamics in larger catchments.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

R. Adams et al.

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R. Adams et al.

R. Adams et al.

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