Articles | Volume 1, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 1, 197–204, 1997
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-1-197-1997
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 1, 197–204, 1997
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-1-197-1997

  31 Mar 1997

31 Mar 1997

Acidification in Three Lake District Tarns: Historical Iong term trends and modelled future behaviour under changing sulphate and nitrate deposition

P. G. Whitchead1, J. Barlow2, E. Y. Haworth3, and J. K. Adamson4 P. G. Whitchead et al.
  • 1Aquatic Environments Research Centre, Dept. of Geography, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 2 AB.
  • 2Dept. Civil Engineering, Imperial College, University of London, Exhibition Road, London W1.
  • 3Institute of Freshwater Ecology, Ferry House, Ambleside, Cumbria, LA22 OLP
  • 4Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Merlewood Research Station, Grange over Sands, Cumbria, LA11 6JU

Abstract. Three upland Lake District Tarns, Scoat, Greendale and Burnmoor, have been evaluated using MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater In Catchments) to reconstruct past, present and future chemical behaviour. The modelled historical changes in acidity are compared with palaeoecological estimation of pH to demonstrate model validity. Chemistry as simulated for all anions and cations and two of the three lakes are shown to have undergone significant acidification. The effects of changing atmospheric pollution levels on lake chemistry is evaluated and 80-90% sulphur reduction levels are required to achieve zero alkalinity. The impacts of increased nitrogen deposition are assessed and are shown to further delay reversibility.

Download